Monday, July 04, 2011

Cranberry juice-The health enhancing benefit

Cranberry juice was first made by American settlers in 1683. It is a love it or hate it beverage. For those who like it, it has a number of health benefits. Let me share some of those.
Emulsifies Fat
This is for all of you that have some excess fat to lose. According to Nutritionist Ann Louise Gittleman, Ph.D., C.N.S., Cranberry juice contains high levels of organic acids, which have an emulsifying effect upon fat deposits. She generally suggests it along with some flax seed or flax seed oil.
Urinary infections
When it comes to urinary tract infections caused by a strain of E coli bacteria, cranberry juice compounds may help. Some of the compounds in the juice block the bacteria from sticking to the cells in the body, so that the body can more easily flush the bacteria out.
Respiratory Infections
Study results in 2002 suggest that cranberry juice may inhibit a type of bacteria that is a common cause of ear and respiratory infections in children. This is according to researchers at the annual meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.
In this study it was found that cranberry juice can inhibit certain strains of Haemophilus influenzae, a type of bacteria found in the nose and throat of 75% of healthy children and adults. The bacteria can also cause infections, and may be responsible for up to 40% of bacterially-derived middle ear infections.
In this study, the researchers found that the juice could prevent certain strains of the bacteria from sticking to red blood cells or mouth cells, a step that can allow the bacteria to linger in the body. It seemed that the juice inhibited the bacteria's pili, the hair-like structures that allow them to adhere to surfaces. The juice had no effect on strains of Haemophilus influenza that lacked pili.
While the results took place in test tubes, this certainly would be something to keep in mind for children and adults who get throat and ear infections.
Don't overdo the juice!
I do want to warn you that excessive consumption of juices. Drinking too much fruit juice can contribute to obesity, the development of cavities (dental caries), diarrhea, and other gastrointestinal problems, such as excessive gas, bloating and abdominal pain. Children especially, as their bodies are smaller for the amount of juice ingested.
Recipe
Consider this more of a medicinal drink than a beverage, and you will do fine. Probably 3 cups a day for an adult, and a half cup 3 times a day for a child, until symptoms abate. 
1 tea bag of Green Tea or Chai Green Tea
(Chia green tea contains ginger, cinnamon, allspice, nutmeg, and clove along with green tea)
2 cups unsweetened Cranberry Juice
Bring one pint of water to a rolling boil. Insert your tea bag and steep 3 to 6 minutes. Pour into a one quart container. Add two cups of unsweetened Cranberry Juice. Store in the refrigerator and use within three days.You can drink this cold or warm it up and drink. If you have used regular green tea you can add a very small pinch of any of the spices mentioned above that is in the Chia tea, for more flavor.
Health benefits
Cranberry juice is known to have various health benefits. These include: Cranberry juice contains phytochemicals, which may help prevent cancer and cardiovascular disease. Cranberry juice is high in oxalate, and has been suggested to increase the risk for developing kidney stones, although more recent studies have indicated it may lower the risk.Cranberry Juices are usually free from artificial colourings, making them suitable for those who do not consume food dyes.
 Cranberry juice and urinary tract infection (UTI)
A known claim is that cranberry juice may help prevent and relieve the symptoms of urinary tract infections by primary and secondary means. The primary means works on the bacteria directly by altering the molecular structure of the fimbriae on the pathogenic strains of the bacteria that cause the infections.The properties of the proanthocyanidins in cranberries prevents the bacteria from adhering to the surface of the bladder and urinary tract.[5] The secondary means works indirectly on the bacteria by changing the intravesical pH (the pH of the bladder's contents) making it more acidic.
However, a recent randomized control trial was unable to show that among women with an acute UTI, drinking cranberry juice (8 oz of 27% twice daily) would reduce the incidence of a second UTI.
 Health issues
Although cranberry juice may help prevent growth of bacteria, its pH may be as acidic as 2.3–2.5, which is more acidic than most soft drinks, which could potentially dissolve tooth enamel over time.
Historically, cranberry fruits and leaves were used for a variety of problems, such as wounds, diarrhea, diabetes, stomach ailments, and liver problems. Most notably, cranberry products have been used in the hope of preventing or treating urinary tract infections. The berries are used to produce beverages and many other food products, as well as dietary supplements in the form of extracts, capsules, or tablets.
Research has examined the use of cranberry in preventing urinary tract infections but study sizes have been too small to provide a definitive answer. Recently, an NCCAM-funded study in Clinical Infectious Diseases found that cranberry juice—given to college-aged women who just recovered from a bladder infection—did not prevent urinary tract infections from coming back. 
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